Grill it Yourself at the Shore Bird in Waikiki

Photo: Fuzzy Gerdes

If you’re looking for a unique dining experience in Hawaii, make reservations for dinner at the Shore Bird Restaurant and Beach Bar. The open air, oceanfront restaurant located in the Outrigger Reef on the Beach Waikiki affords a gorgeous sunset view from Waikiki Beach, making this a great spot for a romantic interlude. But it’s not your usual restaurant meal.

Once you’ve placed your order, your server will bring your fresh meat or seafood entrée to the table – for you to cook. You’ll be instructed on suggested cooking time for your entrée and sent off to the community grill. The grilling area features a professional grill and is equipped with various cooking sauces, spices, and barbecue utensils as well as a large clock with which to keep track of cooking time. It’s a fun and festive atmosphere as diners mingle over the grill awaiting their entrées. Mai tai optional.

Wine Tasting in Hawaii

Photo: paulaloe

Hawaii. Sun, sand, and…wine tasting? The islands may not be your first thought when you think of wine tasting, but oenophiles visiting Hawaii will be happy to note that the beach isn’t the only place to check for great legs. The state of Hawaii boasts two wineries with unique vintages, as well as an assortment of shops that offer wine tasting and special events.


The Wine Stop – This shop offers complimentary wine tasting a couple times a week, along with a variety of special events and seminars.

HASR Wine Co. – Featuring an assortment of premiere Napa Valley auction wines, HASR Wine Co is the place to go if you’re looking for something unique. They represent a number of boutique wineries whose wines are normally available only at the source. Located in Honolulu’s arts district.

The Wine Stop and HASR Wine Co. are just a short drive from hotels like the Hawaii Prince Oahu or the Aqua Palms and Spa Oahu.

SWAM – Shiroma’s Wine and More offers free wine tasting every Thursday from 5-8 pm. You’ll find an assortment of wines, spirits, and gifts at this shop run by a petite Gen Xer. They offer 10% off on Mondays and Tuesdays. Located in Aiea.


Tedeschi Vineyards – Located in upcountry Maui, the tasting room at Maui’s Winery is situated in the King’s Cottage, dating to 1874. Built specifically for the visit of Hawaii’s monarch David Kalakaua and Queen Kapi’olani, the historic cottage is now graced with an 18 foot long bar cut from a single mango tree. The winery at Tedeschi Vineyards produces Ulupalakua Red, as well as wines with a distinct island flavor. Hula O Maui is a crisp, sparkling pineapple wine. Maui Splash is imbued with the distinct flavor of lilikoi, or passion fruit.


Volcano Winery – Situated near Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Winery crafts wines from Symphony grapes grown on site and tropical fruits like guava and jaboticaba. For a one-of-a-kind treat, try the Macadamia Nut Honey Wine. You won’t find that in Napa Valley!

Kahumoku Ohana Hawaiian Music and Lifestyle Workshop

Imagine that you’re a musician (or maybe you really are!) and you’re given the opportunity to spend a week hanging out and learning from your musical heroes. While icons like Santana, Stevie Wonder, and Eric Clapton may not ever make themselves so available to their fans, here in the islands we have our own Hawaiian music icons and they are an ever-present part of the culture here.

Amateur musicians intent on learning to play the ‘ukulele or traditional Hawaiian ki ho‘alu, or slack-key guitar, have the opportunity to do so from the best of the best every year at the Kahumoku Ohana Hawaiian Music and Lifestyle Workshop on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. The workshop is organized by Keoki Kahumoku, a five-time Grammy Award winner in the Hawaiian music category. Keoki shares his music and knowledge of the Hawaiian culture from the heart, warmly welcoming students to the workshop. His wish is to ho‘omau – or share the tradition – of Hawaiian slack-key guitar and ‘ukulele.

“If each student takes what he learns and shares it with one other person, the music is perpetuated,” he says earnestly.

Flanked by two huge plumeria trees, the walkway to the historic Pahala Plantation House leads visitors and participants straight to an impressive pile of rubber slippers and the joyful noise of slack-key tunes and ‘ukulele music wafting from the lanai, the stairwell, the library. Returning participants enthusiastically greet old friends, sharing stories and eventually, trading licks on their favored instrument. New attendees stand, awed by the energy in this place.

“Where do I check in?” one woman asked me, overwhelmed by the bustling activity of new arrivals and a multitude of songs being plucked out by those more familiar with the system. It wasn’t long before she, too, had her ‘ukulele out, adding to the musical mix. This event is a casual one, one that encourages folks to embrace the relaxed attitude that embodies the islands.

‘Ukulele and guitar cases are scattered about the foyer of the Plantation House in anticipation of a whole lot of musical education squeezed into a single week. This year’s instructors include John Keawe, Ledward Kaapana, Herb Ohta, Jr, the amazing James Hill straight from Canada, George Kahumoku, Brittni Paiva, Dennis and David Kamakahi, and so many more. Attendees choose from several workshops daily, and have the chance to sign up for one on one lessons with the instructors.

But it’s not all about the music. Consider it a week-long immersion lesson in Hawaiian culture. Participants come together every morning for ho‘oponopono, a circle gathering to discuss and share ideas and also to practice the chant written specifically for this event. There are lessons in hula, lauhala weaving, lei making, and other cultural crafts. One evening meal is prepared in a traditional imu, or pit oven and all of the meals feature Hawaiian fare like lau lau, poke, poi, and of course, sticky rice. Instructors and students gather every evening for kani ka pila, or a jam session. And there is talk story. Lots and lots of talk story.

Keoki strives to offer his guests a chance to experience the casual, comfortable Hawaiian lifestyle while they are here. But he’s also intent on bringing these values – and the music – to local students who may not have such an opportunity at home. This year, the workshop hosted 25 scholarship students.

An amazing thing happens when youth and adults come together over a shared passion. They find themselves on equal footing, no longer separated by a span of years. Here, they are all musicians, all striving to learn and share. The instructors teach, but so do the attendees, and it’s not uncommon to find a tattooed local boy sharing an island tune with a gray haired visitor.

It’s no surprise, really, that attendees come back for more each year. This is an event that touches heartstrings just as much as the strings on those beloved  guitars and ‘ukuleles.

Interested in owning an ‘ukulele of your own? Please go read this post from Pam at Nerd’s Eye View and consider spending $10 for a chance to win an ‘ukulele from Flea Market Music. Your donation will help to build a village in India. The bidding closes December 13, 2010, so hurry!

Catch Free Performances by The Royal Hawaiian Band

Photo: madmarv00

Visitors to the islands will find plenty of music to enjoy, but one continuing musical tradition dates back to 1836. Founded by King Kamehameha III, The Royal Hawaiian Band (formerly known as The King’s Band) still performs regularly throughout Hawaii and around the world. The heart of the Royal Hawaiian Band, the only full time municipal band in the United States, is Hawaiian music. Featuring stylized Hawaiian melodies including “Sophisticated Hula” and “Hukilau” that band always closes with the famous “Aloha Oe” composed by Queen Liliuokalani. The band has several standing dates on Oahu where you can catch a free concert:

  • Iolani Palace – Fridays at 12 noon
  • Kapiolani Park Bandstand – Sundays at 2 pm
  • Royal Hawaiian Center (at the Royal Hawaiian Waikiki) – Some Thursdays at 1 pm
  • Ala Moana Center Stage (adjacent to the Ala Moana Hotel Waikiki) – Some Wednesdays at 2 pm
  • Mililani Town Center – First Saturday of every month

The band plays other dates and locations, too. Check their online calendar for an updated listing.

AN Ukulele or A Ukulele?

ukes, uke, ukulele, ukelele, HawaiiOh, you grammar mavens are cringing over the possibility of an ‘ukulele, I just know it. But while you’ve probably known this tiny four-stringed instrument as a you-ka-lay-lee, that’s an anglified version of a Hawaiian word. The Hawaiian pronunciation is oo-koo-ley-ley. Pronounce it Hawaiian style, and ‘an ‘ukulele’ sounds just fine.

It’s a problem for someone like me, who writes frequently about Hawaii. If I write it so that it feels comfortable to me, my editor will likely think I’ve skipped Grammar 101. When I do write about ukuleles* I present the issue of pronunciation to my editor. Invariably, ‘an ‘ukulele’ is trashed for the more common ‘a ‘ukulele.’ Editorial license trumps my comfort zone.

I prefer to use the Hawaiian pronunciation because, well, it’s just more accurate. It feels right. Just as a San Franciscan may cringe to hear their city called ‘Frisco,’ I’m sure folks from Hawai‘i find ‘you-ka-lay-lee’ to be a little hard on the ears.

Some people find the Hawaiian pronunciation to be snobbish. I can’t quite follow that train of thought, myself. It seems more respectful to me since the word is Hawaiian in origin. Of course, if you want to continue playing the you-ka-lay-lee, that’s fine by me.

It’s a contentious subject, though. My 17-year-old son is the editor and webmaster of Live ‘Ukulele. Via email, he interviewed a gentleman who used the term ‘a ‘ukulele.’ In his capacity as editor, my son changed the verbiage to ‘a[n] ‘ukulele’ to suit his editorial style. The man in question was not happy about this and things got a little unpleasant. I understand that the changes must have felt awkward to someone who’s used to the corrupted pronunciation, but again with the editorial license. It’s like to-may-to, to-mah-to. No matter how you say it, it’s good stuff.

And as if that isn’t enough controversy for an ‘ukulele, there’s the whole question about how to properly spell the word. I’ll let Aunty Anuhea address that one for you, though.

*Technically, that plural ‘s’ shouldn’t be there, but we’ll push one envelope at a time, ‘kay?

(Photo: Flickr user Runder)

Must See Places of Worship on Oahu

Photo: jdnx

No matter your religious affiliation, these places of worship offer a unique opportunity to visit the history and diverse culture of Hawaii. Enjoy the serenity of a Buddhist Temple, see the Christian church raised in Oahu by missionaries, and pay respects to the Hawaiian culture at a heiau.

Byodo-In – This Buddhist Temple is non-denominational and invites people of all faiths to worship, meditate, or simply enjoy the beauty of the temple and its surroundings. Stand in awe of Amida, a nine-foot-tall golden Buddha housed at the temple or tour the peaceful gardens where you will see koi, peacocks, or black swans. Admission to the Byodo-In grounds is $3/general; $2/seniors; $1/children.

Kawaiahao Church – The first Christian church to be built on Oahu, Kawaiahao Church is made of pink coral. Each slab of coral weighs more than 1,000 pounds and was quarried underwater in depths of 10-20’. The church was completed in 1842. Visitors can attend services conducted in both Hawaiian and English.

Keaiwa Heiau – Located inside the entrance to Keaiwa Heiau State Park, Keaiwa Heiau may look like a collection of loosely jumbled lava rocks to you. But this heiau, or temple, was a medical center and school in Old Hawaii. Plan to bring a picnic lunch and explore all the park has to offer once you’ve spent time at the heiau. Please remember that this is a sacred site. Do not remove anything from the site, and do not climb or walk on the rock walls and platforms.

All three of these locations are an easy driving distance from the heart of Waikiki and budget lodging like the Aston Waikiki Beach Hotel or Park Shore Hawaii.

Top Fun Stops for Kids on Oahu

Sure, the beaches in Hawaii are like a great big sandbox. But the sun and surf day after day can wear a kid out. When you need a break from the sun, these family friendly stops are surefire kid pleasers.

Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center – Catering specifically to young children, the center captivates kids with hands-on exhibits and experiences. Learn about the human body, explore different cultures, discover the plantation history of Hawaii, or imagine what it would be like to be a firefighter. Fair warning: you may need to drag your kids out of there. Maybe shave ice is a good incentive?

Bishop Museum – The museum has much to offer for those interested in the history of Hawaii. What may surprise you is the Science Adventure Center. Interactive exhibits allow kids to explore geology (think: lava!), oceanography, and biology as it relates to the Hawaiian Islands. Pack a picnic to enjoy on the expansive lawn and you could easily spend the better part of a day here.

Photo: Casey Serin

Dole Plantation – Admittedly, the Dole Plantation is tourist attraction that’s heavy on souvenir items. Even so, it makes a pleasant stop if you’re heading toward North Shore. The Pineapple Express takes kids on a 2-mile trip through fields of pineapple and other island crops. The plantation is home to the world’s largest maze, too. Work your way through paths lined with tropical plants in search of eight stations hidden within the pineapple shaped maze. You’ll want to finish off your visit with a Dole Whip. It’s good.

Lilikoi Gingerade

Otherwise known as passion fruit, liliko‘i is Mother Nature’s answer to a SweeTart. The first sour bite of a liliko‘i will jangle all the way back to your jawbone. Stick with it though and you’ll catch the tropical sweet undertones if this much-loved fruit. Filled with small black seeds wrapped in a juicy orange membrane, it grows on a vine that can get rambunctious in this mild climate. While I’m told there have been attempts to eradicate the vine as a pest, I consider myself lucky to have one growing in my backyard.

One can only eat so much liliko‘i fresh out of hand, though, so I find myself juicing much of my bounty to turn into liliko‘i jelly and liliko‘i butter (I want to try this recipe). I also use the juice to make a knock-your-socks-off liliko‘i gingerade. If you’re lucky enough to have access to fresh or frozen liliko‘i juice, this is pure refreshment. Not so lucky? You could substitute lemon juice for the liliko‘i. Or you could come visit.

Liliko‘i Gingerade

  • 6 cups water
  • 1- 6″ piece of fresh ginger
  • 2 cups lilko‘i juice
  • 1 cup sugar

1. Wash the unpeeled ginger and cut into 1″ lengths; place in a blender with 6 cups water. Pulse until ginger is chopped.

2. Strain ginger water into a pitcher. Discard ginger.

3. Stir in liliko‘i juice and sugar.

4. Chill and enjoy.

Local Knowledge

Ever wondered what it would be like to live in Hawai‘i? I found this list I wrote some time back and thought it would be fun to share here. The fact that I live in Hawai‘i is always a conversation starter with people – they’re curious!

  • You cannot get over-sized containers of taco seasoning at Costco. However, you can get li hing mui in extra large containers.
  • It’s commonplace for radio stations to play songs sung in Japanese, English, Hawaiian, and Tahitian, mingled with Christian praise songs and hot body songs. It’s all good.
  • Poinsettias grow here like weeds, and yet at Christmas time, you can buy them in pots at the store.
  • Care must be taken when ordering what you think is Mexican food. A taco is a taco, but tako (which sounds quite the same as taco) is squid. Tako is sold dried as a snack or more often, raw. Dried, it’s just fishy. Raw, it is chewy and not among my top choices for a meal.
  • It is rare for a new business to open without a blessing. New homes, too, are often blessed. Kahuna (a religious leader) generally offer a blessing and chant in the Hawaiian language.
  • People who live in California are called Californians. People who live in Texas are called Texans. People who live in Hawaii are NOT called Hawaiians. That term is reserved for people of Hawaiian ethnicity, no matter where they live.
  • When someone offers you food, it is considered impolite to refuse. No matter what it is. Even tako.

Photo: Payton Chung

If you’re looking for a fun, inexpensive souvenir to bring home from your Hawaiian vacation, look beyond the cheapo 4-for-$10 T-shirts. Take something home that will really give your friends and family a taste of the island. That’s right, folks. I’m suggesting that you shop for souvenirs…at the grocery store. Check the snack aisle or the Asian food aisle, and you’re bound to find something that your friends at home have never even heard of before. Here are a few suggestions:

Crack Seed: This local favorite is primarily a variety of dehydrated and preserved fruits. Crack seed came to Hawaii with the first Chinese immigrants who came to work the plantations – and it’s here to stay. The sweet and salty dried fruit is often flavored with li hing mui. You can pick up crack seed at any grocery store or stop in at a specialty shop like the Crack Seed Center in the Ala Moana Shopping Center.

One-Ton Chips: The Maebo Noodle Factory has been making One-Ton Chips in Hawaii for nearly 60 years.  Made with dough similar to that used to make won tons, these chips are crispy and slightly sweet. You’ll find them in the grocer’s snack aisle or – sometimes – at Costco.

Hawaii Popcorn: You can get this ready to eat or in a microwavable version, but you can bet you’ll have a hard time finding it beyond the islands. The Hawaiian Hurricane flavor is a blend of popcorn, rice crackers, and nori. Unique, yes?

In the Honolulu/Waikiki area you’ll find plenty of convenience stores that may (or may not) carry some of these items. Your best bet for a full service grocery store is the Foodland at Ala Moana Center.